Cloudy, Warmer Cloudy, little warmer. High, 35. Low tonight, 24-26. High yesterday, 30; low, 16. High Sunday, 34-36. T he Circ leville H erald

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Associated Press leased wire for state, national and world news, Central Pres» picture service, leading colnmnists and artists, full local news cover­ age.

Saturday February 15, 196 9 10 Pag es 10c Per Copy 8 6 th Year— 39

Supreme Court M ay Study J _ _ i. Private Club' Legality P r e s i d e n t Says Time Here

WASHINGTON (AP) - A Su­ preme Court appeal that could begin to crumble the last great citadel of discrimination—pri­ vate clubs—has won the potent support of the J ustice Depart­ ment. Moving much as it did before another landmark civil rights decision a year ago, the govern­ ment Friday jumped to the as­ sistance of two Negro women who claimed they were banned from a nominally private swim club in Arkansas. In the earlier case, a private suit was elevated to a govern­ ment crusade when the J ustice Department backed a plea (brought by a racially mix ed St.

argument in the current case on the same law which gave Negroes freed in the Civil War the right to make and enforce contracts without discrimina­ tion.” The women, Mrs. Doris Dan­ iel and Mrs. Rosalyn Kyles, want to use Lake Nix on, a club 12 miles west of Little Rock that offers swimming, picnicking, boating, sun bathing and minia­ ture golf. The club charges a member­ ship fee of 25 cents, giving it a private character beyond the reach, so far, of modern-day civil rights law.

Lake Nix on Club is a contractu­ al relationship can hardly be denied.” The government said the equal accommodations section of the 1964 civil rights law also forces Lake Nix on—and nomi­ nally private clubs like it—to open their doors to Negro mem­ bers. The reason, the government said, is that by importing juke box es, records and 15 paddle boats from out of state and by serving interstate travelers at a snack bar, the club is in inter­ state commerce and therefore forbidden to discriminate. As welcome as the Nix on ad-

For Tax, Money Reforms

Entering the case as i Louis couple who were unable to I friend of the court,” the J us- ministration’s action will be to buy the house they wanted. I tice Department insisted the civil rights forces, it goes just The result was the monumen- I860 law7 prohibits all private, so far. racially motivated conduct u not encompass what which denies or interferes with \ the government called bona fide the Negroes’ right to enter into private clubs. Purely social or crimination in housing sales and contracts to purchase that personal arrangements are be- rentals. which is freely sold to white cit-! yond the intended reach of the The government is basing its | izens. Thai membership in the 1866 law,” the department said.

tal court decision last J une that more than 100 years ago Con­ gress had prohibited racial dis-

Repeated Showings Of JFK Murder Movie Protested

NEW ORLEANS (AP) The 20-second movie filmed as a bul­ let smashed into President J ohn F. Kennedy’.^ head set off an an­ gry protest Friday at Clay Shaw’s conspiracy trial. The state’s sole object is to prejudice the jury,” shouted de­ fense lawyer William Wegmann when the movie was screened

for the second time of the day— the six th time since it was intro­ duced Thursday. Criminal Dist. Court J udge Edward A. Haggerty overruled him. But the defense shouted another protest when the prose­ cution stopped the film on the frame showing the President’s head with a bloody halo.

Dubcek Appears To Hold Power In Czechoslovakia

VIENNA (AP) Moscow ap­ pears to have slackened its *eins on Czechoslovakia’s liber­ al leaders but Soviet occupation

only be defended but pursued. He declared that communism in Czechoslovakia must continue to develop according to the coun troops can tighten the reins at try's liberal and democratic tra- iny time. ditions. Prague’s Communist party It will be no help for us to boss Alex ander Dubcek, con­ demned by the Kremlin as a revisionist” after the August invasion, has reappeared as the political strongman with an ide­ ological offensive supporting the reform ideas that brought him to power in J anuary 1968. In a speech this week at his borne town of Uhrovec, Slova­ kia, Dubcek said the nation’s

defend the post-J anuary poli­ cy,” said Dubcek. It is neces­ sary to develop all values of the post-.Ianuarv policy in our con­ frontation with the present, more complicated reality.” It was a marked change from other speeches by Czechoslovak leaders since the invasion. They had promised to try to retain some of the freedoms gained be post-J anuary reforms should not fore the Soviet tanks rolled in, but also urged caution and Cuyahoga

County CP

Judge Dies

CLEVELAND, Ohio (AP) Cuyahoga County Common Pleas J udge Gerald J . Celebrezze was presiding at a trial in the Crim­ inal Courts Annex building Fri­ day when he collapsed and died of an apparent heart attack. Celebrezze, 38, had just finish­ ed ex plaining a point of law to j ------------------- lawyers at the larceny by trick ! Tuscarawas Valley trial of J erome B. Weiss and

warned the people not to hope for too much too soon. Dubcek spoke like a man sure of his position. A week earlier he confidently told a meeting of high army officers that the Prague leadership had over­ come perhaps the most serious crisis since August.” Dubcek also urged cleansing the party apparatus of conservatives who disagree with the party line. The two speeches led observ­ ers to conclude the 47-year-okl Pubcek had weathered a major confrontation with pro-Moscow hardliners and emerged on top, at least for the present.

The vivid movie made by Abraham Zapruder, a Dallas dress manufacturer, is one of some 50 ex hibits introduced by the prosecution. What the movie proves was a matter of dispute. The Warren Commission pored over it and reached one conclusion, Dist. Atty. J im Garrison reached an­ other. You will be able to see the President fall backwards as the fatal shot strikes him from the front—not the back,” Garrison told the jury in his opening statement. FBI photographic ex pert Lyn- dal L. Shaneyfelt of Alex andria, Va., testified Friday that the study of the film confirmed that, though the President’s head jerked backward, the spray of blood and tissue from the bullet’s impact went for­ ward and up.” The Warren Commission said all of the shots that struck the President and Gov. J ohn B Connally were fired from a six th floor window of the deposi­ tory by Oswald, acting alone. It said it found no credible evi dence of conspiracy. Shaw, 55, a retired New Or leans b u s i n e s s m a n , was charged with conspiring with Oswald and others to murder Kennedy.

SIRHAN B. SIRHAN’S brother Munir and his mother enter the courtroom in Los Angeles, where Sirhan is on trial in the assassination of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy. Sen. Robert Kennedy Slaying

Described At Sirhan Trial

LOS ANGELES (AP) In j were no further incidents and the traumatic moment after Sirhan smiled broadly a number Sen. Robert F. Kennedy was of times during the day. shot, a young busboy cradled The first day’s testimony also the senator’s bloody head in his revealed that a last minute arms, whispered encourage- ; change in plans brought Kenne- ment and placed a rosary in his fjy t0 his deadly encounter with hands. I said tiie first thing that Sirhan—in a pantry off the Am­ bassador Hotel ballroom where

Fluke Brings Wallet Thief To Justice

came to my mind,” J uan Rome- the senator had just claimed ro said Friday to the jury that is (Continued on Page 10) trying Sirhan Bishara Sirhan for ------------------------- Kennedy’s death. I said, ‘Come on Senator, you can make it.’ 1 Then his head dropped back.” Emile Zola Berman, one of Sirhan’s three defenders, said in his opening statement that there is no doubt . . . that he (Sirhan) did, in fact, fire the shot that killed Sen. Kennedy.” But, Berman said, the defense will present psychiatric testimo­ ny that at the actual moment of the shooting he was out of contact with reality, in a trance.”

Rhodes Talks

To Newsmen

On Schools

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP)—Gov. J ames A. Rhodes told Ohio newspaper ex ecutives Friday night that his technical-vocation­ al education program would The. state is trying to prove ¡ " eaf bes‘ overall educa- irk» » till**? Kpnno/iv lnno s I h°nal system in the nation.

J ack N. Abbott when he said* Ladies and gentlemen, we’l! take a short recess.” He collapsed before he could leave the courtroom. Two policemen who were test­ ifying in another courtroom were called to J udge Celebrez- ze’s aid and attempted to give him mouth-to-mouth resuscita­ tion while taking him to St. Vincent Charity Hospital where he was pronounced dead. Assignment Commissioner Richard J . McDonnell said the judge had complained of chest pains for the last couple of days.” Celebrezze. the father of seven children, defeated incumbent Common Pleas J udge Earl R. Hoover last November and took the bench in J anuary. He was the brother of Com­ mon Pleas J udge Frank D. Clebrezze and State Rep. J ames Celebrezze and the nenhew of Federal Court of Appeals J udge Anthonv J . Celebrezze. a former Cleveland mayor who also served as secretary of Health. Education and Welfare in the Kennedy Ad mi nitration.

Keeping Score

On The Rainfall

Poverty Grant Set COLUMBUS, Ohio (A P )-T he Appalachian Regional Commis­ sion has approved a $28,635 grant to the Tuscarawas Valley Regional Advisory Committee, Albert G. Giles, director, Ohio Department of Urban Affairs, announced. The funds will assist in li- nancing the development and administration of Ohio’s Appal­ achian Plan in the eight county district, and for maintenance of a central office. Counties in the district arc Carroll, Coshocton, Guernsey, Harrison, Holmes, J efferson, Muskingum and Tus- I carawas.

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) The odds were 400,000 to 1. A month ago, William Schess- barger, a bartender, lost his billfold in a tax icab. It was found by Robert Dodd, 26, who kept it and used Schess- barger’s identification and cred­ it cards to cash forged checks, poiice said. This morning Dodd went into a Toledo bar and asked to cash a check. Well if you have identifica­ tion,” said the bartender. The check was cashed and when Dodd went to a restroom, the bartender called police. The bartender was Schess- bai o r. Police said Dodd confessed and also began telling about other alleged crimes. Asked why, Dodd replied:

Sirhan killed Kennedy, J une 5, 1968 with malice and premedita­ tion—the elements of first de­ gree murder. The defense hopes to show the killing was impul­ sive, without premeditation or malice. As Berman put it: to­ tally a product of a sick, ob­ sessed mind and personality.” The pale, 24-year-old J orda­ nian rose from his chair in pro­ test as Berman described him thus. He was obviously agitated, murmuring No, no.” A court inspector leaned over the chair ! of defense investigator Michael McCowan and said, Talk to him, Mike.” McCowan pushed Sirhan back into his chair and whispered to him for several minutes. There

Dedicate Building COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP)

Rhodes spoke at the Ohio Newspaper Association’s annual awards banquet. He said Ohio has brought its higher education system up to date and now must work at get­ ting jobs for youths wiio don’t want to go to college. We are not going to take any­ thing from the educational sys­ tem as some have suggested,” ! Rhodes said. We are going to j add something to it that will make it greater than ever.” The governor said the state’s present educational system con­ tributed to unemployment. He blamed the increasing crime rat.? end growing welfare rolls on the fact that 83 per cent of the unemployed are under 35.

T h e awe rds banquet capped

New Thinking

Is Required

Of Treasury

WASHINGTON (AP) Presi-i dent Nix on says the time is ripe for tax reform and he wants the Treasury Department to think in completely new terms” about It. Describing the current tax system as something that has grown like Topsy out of neces­ sity,” Nix on said Friday that congress is now receptive to change.” Nix on commented during a goodwill \isit to the Treasury, part of the round of visits he has made to all but one of his Cabi­ net departments. He also went to Health. Education and Wel­ fare Friday and said he will go to Interior nex t week. Nix on said the reassessment he is recommending for tax re form also should be applied to international matters. Now* is the time to ex amine the. international monetary sys­ tem where its strengths are, where its weaknesses are,” he said. At HEW, Nix on told employes he was once a minor govern ment lawyer and considered it a pretty low form of life.” He added, however, that in looking back he realizes the job he did as a P-3 government law yar working on tire regulations in 1942 was important. Our job at the top can only be done if w7e let people up and down the line know we know what they’re doing and appreci ate w*hat they’re doing,” he said Earlier in the day, Nix on signed an ex ecutive order creat­ ing an Office of Intergovern­ mental Relations to be run by Vice President Spiro T. Agnew. lie indicated its main task would be coordinating relations with state and local govern­ ments, but neither lie nor Ag­ new7 gave any specifics. Nix on aiso established a new7 White House post to keep for­ mer presidents informed of im­ portant developments. Retired Brig. Gen. Robert L. Schulz, an aide to former Presi­ dent Eisenhower, was named to the job that eventually will pay $30,000 a year. Shulz, who re­ mains an aide to Eisenhower, is drawing pay for that job, plus a pension and won’t be compen­ sated in the White House posi­ tion.

College Protests Continue; Police, Guard On Duty

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS [dent demands that it rescind re Police broke up a protest j primands against 200 students march by 2.000 University of Wisconsin students Friday night, part of the current w a ve! of unrest on a number of the na-1 tion’s college campuses. Wisconsin’s Chancellor H. Ed­ win Young had earlier with-

arrested in u September sit-in. New York City—The president of City College said he agreed with the demands of a group of black and Puerto Rican stu­ dents who took over the admin­ istration building for several drawn the 1,900 National hours Thursday but could not Guardsmen from the campus say yes to all of them, and promised they would re- Denver, Colo.—The Colorado main on standby unless stu- j legislature completed action on dents renew campus disturb* a bill making it a crime punish- anees.” At Duke University in Dur­ ham, N.C., 500 guardsmen re­ mained at the ready two miles from the campus and President Douglas M. Knight’s scheduled discussion of black students’ de­ mand this afternoon was post­ poned. At San Francisco State Col­ lege, three hecklers and the Ne­ gro director of the school’s new Black studies Department were arrested Fridav after they inter­ rupted a speech by Acting Pres­ ident S.l. Hayakawa. Nathan Hare, the director, led the hecklers onto the stage where Hayakawa was welcom­ ing about 350 teachers for the spring semester which begins Monday. Get the hell out of here!” Hayakawa barked at Hare. Laughing. Hare replied. We’re not going.” This is a perfect ex ample of their tactics to suppress free­ dom of speech,” Hayakawa told the audience later during a lull in the noise. He was cheered when he pledged to keep the campus open no matter what it takes.” Elsewhere there were these developments: Urhana, 111.—The university of Illinois faculty disciplinary committee rejected Negro stu-

able by a fine up to $500 and a jail sentence of up to one year to interfere with any student seeking to attend college class­ es. Gov. J ohn Love indicated he would sign the measure.

Dock Workers

lack In N.Y.

Other Big Ports Not Affected

NEW YORK (AP) Port of New York longshoremen return to work today after eight weeks on strike with a new three-vear contract in their pockets, but negotiations continue at other Atlantic and Gulf Coast ports. Longshoremen voted Friday, j by 9,328 to 3,213, to accept the agreement reached on J an. 14 by the New York Shipping Asso- j ¡elation and the International { U n d e r m C I I C t m e n t

Snow Rakes

Wide Area

Of Plains

By TIIE ASSOCIATED PRESS Snow swept much of the Great Plains region today and slowed highway travel through an area from Oklahoma to Minnesota. Cold rain chilled a wide stretch of the South and turned to sleet or snow in some upland leaders were urging ratification.

Peru Frees

Wishing Boat;

U.S. Angered

M ay Cut Off M ilitary Aid To New Regime

LIMA, Peru (AP) The Pe­ ruvian government has released an American tuna boat captured in the Pacific Friday, but Wash­ ington sources said the incident could precipitate a cutoff of U.S. aid to Peru. The American vessel, Mariner was captured by a Peruvian navy gunboat which attacked a small fishing fleet more than 23 miles off the Peruvian coast. The skipper of another vessel reported his boat was peppered with machine gun fire before the gunboat was driven off. No injuries were reported in the attack, which U.S. Secretary of State Wihiam P. Rogers called wholly unjustified.” Peru’s ambassador to the United States, Fernando Berck- emeyr, said the American boats were operating in Peru­ vian waters without licenses. Peru claims territorial jurisdic­ tion 200 miles out to sea, but the United States considers any boat in international waters if it is more than 12 miles off the coast. The Peruvian Naval Ministry (Continued on Page 10)

State Officials

Longshoremen’s Association. The ballot was held under a federal court order secured by the National Labor Relations Board. Union officials had sought to block the vote until the others agreed to similar terms. On the eve of the vote union

In Fraud Case

NEW ORLEANS (AP) Louisiana’s attorney general, a state legislator and two other men have been indicted on charges of obtaining money and property by fraud and conspira-

Oliio feftate University’s new $2.4 activities. The meeting was to million School of Nursing build- end today following a panel dis- in g was dedicated Friday in eussion between Ohio govern-

sections of the Southeast. H Trav elers warn in g s were in the conventions second day of effect for portions of 16 states in the midcontincnt and across the South. A slow-moving weather sys- In a city of 400,000, for thb _ ___ ______ = to have happened I might as I ceremonies attended by Gov. mental leaders and newspaper ; tom stretchine tiie lennth of the well come clean.” ! J ames A. Rhodes. officials. p l i s c“ U M , « of snow into parts of central Kan Allies Ignore Red Vietnam Truce

apparently believing it would c*"n put pressure on the other ports, j But William Arnett, chief nego­ tiator for the West Coast Mari­ time Association in Galveston. Tex ., said A settlement in New | York means only that—a settle­ ment in New York.” Tentative agreements had al-

as. eastern Nebraska a n d ready been retched in ports

rfce 16-count indictment re­ turned Friday by a federal grand jury stemmed from the bankruptcy of the Louisiana Loan & Thrift Corp., which had about 1,400 depositors and de­ posits of $2.5 million. J ack P.F. Gremiilion, state attorney general since 1954, said, I am deeply shocked and

ItainiaU tur a 34 Uour Period i ndine ®t S » . » . ........................ A ctu al lin c e r e d . 1 .................... Norm a l aln ce F tb , 1 •• *•*? BBHINII .28 INCH Normal *lru*e J anuary I < Actú alo e* J a n u a ry I I J* H iv er .......................... .................. assr SS

SAIGON (AP) Allied forces ignored the start of a Viet Cong cease-lire today and continued ail* strikes and CO offensive op­ erations of battalion size or larger. The enemy stand-down for 'let, the lunar new year holiday that begins Monday, is sched­ uled to last until Feb. 22. A South Vietnamese government source said Saigon would an­ nounce a short allied truce for Monday. But he said the government would not announce details of the cease-fire until 11 p.m. Sai­ gon time (10 a.m. EST), be­ cause it feared the enemy might break (heir own cease-fire pledge as they did last year, when they hit Saigon and 120

towns and cities in their biggest offensive of the war. U.S. intelligence sources said three major North Vietnamese

There was widespread feeling Nix on’s personal contact with chief U S. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge and other mem

lighted a match and burned to death, South Vietnamese au­ thorities reported. They said the incident uc- divisions, the 1st, 7th and 9th, I curred in front ol a pagoda. N o ! v of ihrd ele 'alion eou]d iead a r. In border a rea , near Cam- dole, were found ami no rea.on S t i v e bodia and not in pobition right was determined tor the action. ^ break the deadlock now to attack Saigon. They said As the Viet Cong truce began / elements of the North Viet- \ some terrorist activity was re- 1 ? . P ro*e ported but there was no major vvlt(im hours oi Nix ons inaugu- eround fichtins ration J an. ¿ 0 and tiie two have Despite the allied spoiling op- been in touch since the ex pand­ erations, the Communist com- ta,^s !^an* .^0* I1 mand said its armed forces bodge has not had a chance to arc capable of striking any- a tace-to iace report on where, any place, any time, the deadlock which became ap- from the cities to the rural Parenl at the first meeting, areas.” The Vietnam News Agency re­ in Paris, where the peace ported that I*e Due Tho, specia talks are stalled, the negotia* adviser to the head of the North tors’ attention was focused on Vietnamese delegation in Pa i* the Feb. 28 visit of President Nix on.

northeastern Oklahoma. Rain fell from Tex as to Geor­ gia through the night. Tempera­ tures settled into the 30s over most of the region. A new storm system bearing

namese 5th Division do pose a threat in War Zone D, about 30 miles north of the capital. They’re not in position to launch a significant attack on Saigon right now,” said one source, but that certainly doesn’t preclude isolated terror­ ist attacks and small-scale a saults.” In Bien Hoa province east of Saigon, a tnan wearing tiie robes of y Buddhist monk poured gasoline over himself,

The indictment accuses the five defendants of making false statements to prospective pur­ chasers to stimulate sales of LL&T bond investment certifi­ cates and of diverting money7

down” on the Pacific Northwest|Vu., management associations 1f[om lhe tirm tu the,r uwn presented what they called their Ul*

the larger ports. Negotiations were set for this afternoon in Philadelphia. No definite time wag decided on in Boston. In Baltimore and Norfolk,

scattered rain from Washington into central California. Travel­ ers warnings were in effect for locally heavy snow in mountain areas of northern California. Clear skies were confined to u / . the northeastern quarter of the Medal W inner Dies

final offers” Friday after sev­ eral weeks of intensive negotia­ tions and said no more details were bargainable.

returned to Hanoi Thursday to report to his government.

country which also was nipped by the coudest weather. Temper­ atures slid into the teens from Michigan to Massachusetts and si uth into Maryland. The mercury tumbled to 9 be­ low zero at Pellston, Mich., while Key West, Fla., had an overnight low of 72a

SEATTLE (AP) William C. Horton, at 92 the nation’s oldest medal of honor winner, died Friday. Horton served in the Marine Corps during the Box er Rebellion in China. He was cited for action during the siege of the U.S. Embassy in Peking m 1900.

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII MII III Itl ll ll lll ll ll li

Roundtown

l l l l l l l l l i l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l i l l l l l l l l l l l l l i l l l

T W O Valentines were delivered at Berger Hospital Friday . , , Mr. and Mrs Doyle Painter, 1010 Lynwood Ave., and Mr. and Mrs. Lewis J ordan, Route I, became parents of daughters boro ou St. Valentine's Day,

Cloudy, Warmer Cloudy, little warmer. High, SS. Low tonight, 24-26. High yesterday, 30; low, 16. 'High Sunday, 34-36. T he Circleville Herald

FULL SERVICE

Associated Press leased wire for state, national and world news, Central Press picture service, leading columnists and artists, full local news cover­ age. Saturday February IS, 1969 IO Pages 10c Per Copy 86th Year——39

Supreme Court May Study 'Private Club' Legality

WASHINGTON (AP) - A Su­ preme Court appeal that could begin to crumble the last great citadel of discrimination—pri­ vate clubs—has won the potent support of the Justice Depart­ ment. Moving much as it did before another landmark civil rights decision a year ago, the govern­ ment Friday jumped to the as­ sistance of two Negro women who claimed they were banned from a nominally private swim club in Arkansas. In the earlier case, a private suit was elevated to a govern­ ment crusade when the Justice Department backed a plea brought by a racially mixed St. Louis couple who were unable to buy the house they wanted. The result was the monumen­ tal court decision last June that more than IOO years ago Con­ gress had prohibited racial dis­ crimination in housing sales and rentals. The government is basing its

argument in the current case on the same lav; which gave Negroes freed in the Civil War the right to make and enforce contracts without discrimina­ tion.” The women, Mrs. Doris Dan­ iel and Mrs. Rosalyn Kyles, want to use Lake Nixon, a club 12 miles west of Little Rock that offers swimming, picnicking, boating, sun bathing and minia­ ture golf. The club charges a member­ ship fee of 25 cents, giving it a private character beyond the reach, so far, of modern-day civil rights law. Entering the case as a “friend of the court,” the Jus­ tice Department insisted the 1866 law “prohibits all private, racially motivated conduct which denies or interferes with the Negroes’ right to enter into contracts to purchase that which is freely sold to white cit­ izens. That membership in the

Lake Nixon Chib is a contractu­ al relationship can hardly be denied.” The government said the equal accommodations section of the 1964 civil rights law also forces Lake Nixon—and nomi­ nally private clubs Uke it—to open their doors to Negro mem­ bers. The reason, the government said, is that by importing juke boxes, records and 15 paddle boats from out of state and by serving interstate travelers at a snack bar, the club is in inter­ state commerce and therefore forbidden to discriminate. As welcome as the Nixon ad­ ministration’s action will be to civil rights forces, it goes just so far. It does not encompass what the government called bona fide private clubs. Purely social or personal arrangements are be­ yond the intended reach of the 1866 law,” the department said.

President Says Time Here For Tax, Money Reforms

Repeated Showings Of JFK Murder Movie Protested

NEW ORLEANS (AP) The 20-second movie filmed as a bul­ let smashed into President John F. Kennedy's head set ofl an an­ gry protest Friday at Clay Shaw’s conspiracy trial. “Hie state’s sole object is to prejudice the jury,” shouted de­ fense lawyer William Wegmann when the movie was screened

for the second time of the day— the sixth time since it was intro­ duced Thursday. Criminal Dist. Court Judge Edward A. Haggerty overruled him. But the defense shouted another protest when the prose­ cution stopped the film on the frame showing the President’s head with a bloody halo.

Dubcek Appears To Hold Power In Czechoslovakia

VIENNA (AP) Moscow ap­ pears to have slackened its eeins on Czechoslovakia's liber- ti leaders but Soviet occupation troops can tighten the reins at my time. Prague’s Communist party boss Alexander Dubcek, con­ demned by the Kremlin as a “revisionist” after the August invasion, has reappeared as the political strongman with an ide­ ological offensive supporting the reform ideas that brought him to power in January 1968. In a speech this week at his borne town of Uhrovec, Slova­ kia, Dubcek said the nation’s post-January reforms should not

Cuyahoga County CP Judge Dies

CLEVELAND, Ohio (AP) - Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Judge Gerald J. Celebrezze was presiding at a trial in the Crim­ inal Courts Annex building Fri­ day when he collapsed and died of an apparent heart attack. Celebrezze, 38, had just finish­ ed explaining a point of law to lawyers at the larceny by trick trial of Jerome B. Weiss and Jack N. Abbott whep he said: “Ladies and gentlemen, wc’ll take a short recess.” He collapsed before he could leave the courtroom. Two policemen who were test­ ifying in another courtroom were called to Judge Celebrer- ze’s aid and attempted to give him mouth-to-mouth resuscita­ tion while taking him to St. Vincent Charity Hospital where lie was pronounced dead. Assignment Commissioner Ptichard J. McDonnell said tile judge had complained of chest pains “for the last couple of days.” Celebrezze. the father of seven children, defeated incumbent Common Pleas Judge Earl R. Hoover last November and tool: the bench in January. He was the brother of Com­ mon Pleas Judge Frank D. Clebrezze and State Rep. James 1J. Celebrezze and the nephew of Federal Court of Appeals Judge Anthonv J. Celebrezze. a former Cleveland mayor who also served as secretary of Health. Education and Welfare in the Kennedy Adminstration.

only be defended but pursued. He declared that communism in Czechoslovakia must continue to develop according to the coun­ try’s liberal and democratic tra­ ditions. “It will be no help for us to defend the post-January poli­ cy,” said Dubcek. “It is neces­ sary to develop all values of the post-January policy in our con­ frontation with the present, more complicated reality.” It was a marked change from other speeches by Czechoslovak leaders since the invasion. They had promised to try to retain some of the freedoms gained be fore the Soviet tanks rolled in. but also urged caution and warned the people not to hope for too much too soon. Dubcek spoke like a man sure of his position. A week earlier he confidently told a meeting of high army officers that the Prague leadership had over come “perhaps the most serious crisis since August.” Dubcek also urged cleansing the party apparatus of conservatives who disagree with the party line. The two speeches led observ­ ers to conclude the 47-year-old Dubcek had weathered a major confrontation with pro-Moscow hardliners and emerged on top, at least for the present.

The vivid movie made by Abraham Zapmder, a Dallas dress manufacturer, is one of some 50 exhibits introduced by the prosecution. What the movie proves was a matter of dispute. The Warren Commission pored over it and reached one conclusion, Dist. Atty. Jim Garrison reached an­ other. “You will be able to see the President fall backwards as the fatal shot strikes him from the front—not the back,” Garrison told the jury in his opening statement. FBI photographic expert Lyn- dal L. Shaneyfelt of Alexandria, Va., testified Friday that tile study of the film confirmed that, though the President’s head jerked backward, the spray of blood and tissue from the bullet’s impact went “for ward and up.” The Warren Commission said all of the shots that struck the President and Gov. John B. Connally were fired from I sixth floor window of the deposi tory by Oswald, acting alone. It said it found no credible evi dence of conspiracy. Shaw, 55, a retired New Or­ leans b u s i n e s s m a n , was charged with conspiring with Oswald and others to murder Kennedy.

New Thinking s Required Treasury

SIRHAN B. SIKH AN’S brother Munir and his mother enter tile courtroom in Los Angeles, where Sirhan is on trial in the assassination of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy. Sen. Robert Kennedy Slaying Described At Sirhan Trial

Tuscarawas Valley Poverty Grant Set COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP)-The Appalachian Regional Commis­ sion has approved a $28,635 grant to the Tuscarawas Valley Regional Advisory Committee, Albert G. Giles, director, Ohio Department of Urban Affairs, announced. The funds will assist in fi­ nancing the development, and administration of Ohio’s Appal­ achian Plan in the eight county district, and for maintenance of a central office. Counties in the district arc Carroll, Coshocton, Guernsey, Harrison, Holmes, Jefferson, Muskingum and Tus­ carawas.

Fluke Brings Wallet Thief To Justice

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) The odds were 400,000 to I. A month ago, William Schess- barger, a bartender, lost his billfold in a taxicab. It was found by Robert Dodd, 26, who kept it and used Schess- barger’s identification and cred­ it cards to cash forged checks, police said. This morning Dodd went into a Toledo bar and asked to cash a check. “Well if you have identifica­ tion,” said the bartender. The check was cashed and when Dodd went to a restroom, the bartender called police. The bartender was Schess- barger. Police said Dodd confessed and also began telling about other alleged crimes. Asked why, Dodd replied: In a city of 400,000, for this to have happened I might as well come clean.”

LOS ANGELES (AP) In the traumatic moment after Sen. Robert F. Kennedy was shot, a young busboy cradled the senator’s bloody bead in his arms, whispered encourage­ ment and placed a rosary in his hands. “I said the first thing that came to my mind,” Juan Rome­ ro said Friday to the jury that is trying Sirhan Bishara Sirhan for Kennedy’s death. “I said, ’Come on Senator, you can make it.' Then his head dropped back.” Emile Zola Berman, one of Sirhan’s three defenders, said in his opening statement that “there is no doubt . . . that he (Sirhan) did, in fact, fire the shot that killed Sen. Kennedy.” But, Berman said, the defense will present psychiatric testimo­ ny that “at the actual moment of the shooting he was out of contact with reality, in a trance.” The state is trying to prove Sirhan killed Kennedy, June 5, 1968 with malice and premedita­ tion—the elements of first de­ gree murder. The defense hopes to show the killing was impul­ sive, without premeditation or malice. As Berman put it: “to­ tally a product of a sick, ob­ sessed mind and personality.” The pale, 24-year-old Jorda­ nian rose from his chair in pro­ test as Berman described him thus. He was obviously agitated, murmuring “No, no.” A court inspector leaned over the chair of defense investigator Michael McCowan and said, “Talk to him. Mike.” McCowan pushed Sirhan back into his chair and whispered to him for several minutes. There

Dedicate Building COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) Ohio State University’s new $2.4 million School of Nursing build­ ing was dedicated Friday in ceremonies attended by Gov. James A. Rhodes.

were no further incidents and Sirhan smiled broadly a number of times during the day. The first day’s testimony also revealed that a last minute change in plans brought Kenne dy to his deadly encounter with Sirhan—in a pantry off the Am bassador Hotel ballroom where the senator had just claimed (Continued on Page IO)

College Protests Continue; Police,

Rhodes Talks To Newsmen On Schools

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP)—Gov. James A. Rhodes told Ohio newspaper executives Friday night that his technical-vocation­ al education program would create the best overall educa­ tional system in the nation. Rhodes spoke at the Ohio Newspaper Association’s annual awards banquet. He said Ohio has brought its higher education system up to date and now must work at get­ ting jobs for youths who don’t want to go to college. “We a»*e not going to take any­ thing from the educational sys­ tem as some have suggested,” Rhodes said. “We are going to add something to it that will make* it greater than ever.” The governor said the state’s present educational system con tributed to unemployment. He blamed the increasing crime rate tm cl growing welfare rolls on the fact that 83 per cent of the unemployed are under 35. The awards banquet capped the convention’s second day of activities. The meeting was to end today following a panel dis­ cussion between Ohio govern­ mental leaders and newspaper officials.

WASHINGTON (AP) Presi­ dent Nixon says the time is ripe for tax reform and he wants the Treasury Department to “think In completely new terms” about It. Describing the current tax system as something that has 'grown like Topsy out of neces­ sity,” Nixon said Friday that ‘congress is now receptive to change.” Nixon commented during a goodwill visit to the Treasury, part of the round of visits he has made to all but one of his Cabi­ net departments. He also went to Health, Education and Wel­ fare Friday and said he will go to Interior next week. Nixon said the reassessment he is recommending for tax re­ form also should be applied to international matters. “Now is the time to examine the international monetary sys­ tem where its strengths are, where its weaknesses are,” he said. At HEW, Nixon told employes he was once a minor govern­ ment lawyer and considered it a “pretty low form of life.” He added, however, that in looking back he realizes the job he did as a P-3 government law­ yer working on tire regulations in 1942 was important. Our job at the top can only be done if we let people up and down the line know we know what they’re doing and appreci­ ate what they’re doing,” he said. Earlier in the day, Nixon signed an executive order creat­ ing an Office of Intergovern­ mental Relations to be run by Vice President Spiro T. Agnew. He indicated its main task would be coordinating relations with state and local govern­ ments, but neither he nor Ag­ new gave any specifics.